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My Real Life Story I Grew Up In A Kotha Where I Was Ridiculed As ‘The Son Of A Prostitute’; I Overcame It With Education

Athira Jishnu

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“In the 1980s, when the kotha culture was on the decay, I experienced childhood in Congress House, Mumbai, and Bandook Gully, Kolkata, two noteworthy dusk hotspots for men who needed to shower 10 rupee notes on the singing-moving nautch young ladies, or prostitutes.

The women working in these kothas had several appellations such as tawaif, baiji, kothewali, mujrewali, kamanewaali, but r**** was a standard word used to address them collectively. The nautch girls were not sex-workers, but it is tricky for men to distinguish between the two professions because in their eyes women performing mujras are hinting at sexual availability.

When the women sang ‘Salaam-e-ishq meri jaan zara qubool kar lo’, every man sitting in the audience believed it was meant for him and him alone. And that’s when they often overstepped when a courtesan followed it with the second line, ‘Tum hum se pyar karne ki zara si bhool kar lo.’ The women sold ada, but the men were fida over something else entirely.

Another disadvantage of that stigma was that every time I stepped out of the kotha, I would hear someone shouting out ‘R**** ka beta’ to shame me. My mother was sold to a madam in a kotha in Kolkata when she reached puberty. She was a child bride before that, working as a bonded labourer for a family in Agra. She belongs to the Kanjarbhat community from Pune.

To me, my mother’s profession was like a magician’s bravura performance. She wore stunning costumes and she smelled of exotic perfumes. She danced like an acrobat, balancing a half-full bottle of Thumbs-Up on her head, and contorting her body to pick notes with her mouth from the raees (patrons) who insisted on tricks of the trade. She could be equally gracious as a chanteuse, holding a note (a musical one) when she sang popular ghazals. I watched her in awe and imbibed some of her steadfast qualities, though I can hardly match her footwork, or her vocal pitch.

What was difficult to deal with as a child was not her job but the complexities of adjusting to the worlds inside and outside the kotha. Inside the kotha, life was heaven. Outside, hell awaited us.

It took me some getting used to the taunts we were subjected to. When my mother enrolled me in a boarding school in Kurseong, and later in Darjeeling, books helped me cope with the ignominy we faced outside our home.

I immersed myself in my studies, became an autodidact chewing up the school library, and burnished the ambition to become a writer from an early age. I did not have this inclination or intelligence because I wanted to tell my mother’s story. I simply wanted to adopt another language in order to not be influenced by the toxic environment around me back in the kotha where I spent my winter vacations.

Over the years, the cuss words r**** ka beta became ineffective. Education had fortified me to disregard humiliation. Abuse no longer rankled me.

Some of my friends from the kothas and outside feel betrayed that I have recently started talking about my past, and have been sharing my story. They have almost no insight about how it will shape and empower my future.

I work as a journalist, contributing as a freelancer to The Hindu newspaper. I have previously worked in Scroll and Midday. With no training or background in journalism, I have come this far only because my mother had the foresight to educate me. Next month, my first book Lean Days, a travel-fiction roman-a-clef is being published by HarperCollins. I feel now the time is ripe to narrate something worthwhile next – not my, but my mother’s survival story.”

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The Whale Vomited: Jumras gets a fortune of Rs 2 crore 26 lakhs!

Roselin Ravikrishnan

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The Whale Vomited Jumras gets a fortune of Rs 2 crore 26 lakhs

The Goddess of Wisdom looked after a Thai fisherman in the form of whale vomit. Don’t be alarmed by the vomiting of a whale, but be shocked if you can. Jumras Theokhat, a fisherman, received a vomit worth Rs. As we walk along Koh Samui beach, we notice the Jumras stone-like object. Jumras preserved the stone and kept it special. Jumras informed government officials that they were suspicious. They came and checked and the sample was taken for expert examination. There was no information for months. Authorities contacted Jumras a few days ago.

Whale Vomitted

Whale Vomited

Jumras has the oil sap of a whale. The sap, which weighs about six kilograms and 350 grams, is said to be worth 2 crores 26 lakhs. Authorities have promised to pay Jumras a fair price if the property is handed over to the government. Jumras told the media that this was a treasure he had brought to the sea. Whale vomiting is mainly used in the perfume industry. It is essential for the manufacture of odorless alcohol perfume

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19 year old girl with two Vaginas, Finds 8 year after Treatments!

Roselin Ravikrishnan

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19-year-old girl with two Vaginas, Finds 8 year after Treatments

After eight years of treatment, 19-year-old Molly Rose Taylor learns about her rare condition. Molly has been in severe pain since her first menstruation at the age of nine. Molly, a native of Kent, consulted many doctors. Even with the use of a tampon, menstrual blood came out. Molly had a rare condition called Uterus didelphys.

Molly Rose Taylor Molly Rose Taylor

The vagina is divided into two halves with a tissue of 2 cm. That is two vagina body types. Molly’s vagina is a longitudinal septum, a two cm long tissue. It was removed in 2017. Doctors initially suspected it was a sexually transmitted disease. A subsequent examination revealed that Molly had two vaginal and two cervical faces. Doctors have warned of extra care in future situations. This is a rare condition in one in every 3,000 people

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Can’t find a suitable groom, Matrimony should be compensated by the doctor!

Roselin Ravikrishnan

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Can't find a suitable groom, Matrimony should be compensated by the doctor

The court ruled that Matrimony should be compensated because he could not find a suitable groom. The District Consumer Dispute Redressal Forum has asked the Marriage Bureau to pay the complainant a fee of Rs 50,000 along with interest, plus Rs 12,000 in compensation and costs.

Matrimony Photos

Matrimony Photos

The Bureau promised to find a suitable young man from the Jat community who would work as a doctor. The Bureau also promised to provide information on 18 prospective first-timers and get married within 9 months. However, Chahal canceled his contract with the Bureau after he failed to find a suitable marriage proposal. The complainant is Surinder Pal Singh Chahal from Mohali. According to the petitioner, the marriage bureau of Wedding Venues was involved in a newspaper advertisement for her daughter, who was working as a doctor in Haryana. Believing the bureau’s promises, he signed a contract worth Rs 50,000. He was included in the Royal Member category.

Matrimony Images

Matrimony Images

The Bureau held that when the incident was controversial, they were only offering consultations and did not promise 100 percent success. But this was not approved by the Consumer Dispute Resolution Forum. The forum said the bureau was offering absurd justifications. Not only was the complainant losing money but also wasting valuable time. He said the agency had failed miserably to fulfill its professional service and ordered it to pay a hefty fine

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